Archive for the ‘ Vegetables ’ Category

CTV Morning Live Carrot Cake

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This simple yet very tasty cake is sure to please everyone… even the kids who don’t like carrots will eat it (just don’t tell them what’s in it). Here is the recipe for the carrot cake muffins as seen on CTV Morning Live on February 6th, 2013.

Add a little bit of powder sugar to this cake and voila, you have a very tasty cake!

Add a little bit of powder sugar to this cake and voila, you have a very tasty cake!


  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 1.5 cups white sugar
  • 1/2 cups lightly packed brown sugar
  • 2 cups grated carrots
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons of 24 Carrot Chutney


  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Grease and flour one 9 x 13 inch pans.
  2. In a large bowl, beat eggs until light and frothy. Mix in oil and sugar. Stir in zucchini, chutney and vanilla. Combine flour, soda, baking powder and salt; stir into the egg mixture. Pour into the pan.
  3. Bake for 60 to 75 minutes, or until done.

** if making muffins or cupcakes; raise heat to 350 and cook for approx. 18 minutes (or until a toothpick comes out clean).

Love notes: you can substitute the vegetable oil for olive oil; it will give a quite nice earthy taste to this cake.


Garlic Scapes Recipes

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It’s that time of the year when Garlic Scapes are available at your local farmers’ market. I remember discovering this unique item a few years back. I’ve used it in scrambled eggs, biscuits and as a flavour kick in a stir-fry.

Garlic Scapes Recipes

Here are two very simple recipes for this curly garlic lovers dream ingredient.

Garlic Scapes & Potato Salad

10 red potatoes, scrubbed & cubed ( 2 1/2 lbs)
3 stalks celery, chopped
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1 cup finely chopped garlic scapes (food processor works best)
1/2 cup finely chopped red onions

2/3 cup buttermilk
1/4 cup light mayonnaise
3 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
3/4 teaspoon salt
3/4 teaspoon pepper

1. Cook potatoes in boiling salted water until tender, approx. 10 minutes.
2. Drain water from potatoes & place in a bowl; add celery.
3. Heat oil in nonstick skillet over medium; fry the scapes & onions, until onions are softened & scapes are tender-crisp, about 5 minutes.
4. Add to potatoes.
5. DRESSING: Whisk together buttermilk, mayo, 2 tbsp of the dill, mustard& seasonings in a bowl; pour over potato mixture& toss to coat.
Cover & refrigerate for up to 2 days.

Garlic Scapes Pesto

We like the earthy sweetness of walnuts but you can use any nut you like. Cheese is optional and if you are planning on keeping the pesto and using it as a spread or to season soups and such, adding the cheese as needed isn’t a bad idea.

½ pound of garlic scapes
¼ cup walnuts
Juice from half a lemon
¼ cup olive oil
¼ cup Parmesan cheese (optional)
Salt and pepper

Trim the tougher bases off the scapes before blitzing everything together in your food processor. Taste and adjust seasonings. This pesto is great used the traditional way (tossed with hot pasta) but it is also good to keep on hand for use in sandwiches (mix it with mayo if you like), as a dip for sweet potato fries or grilled vegetables, or to flavour soups and salad dressings.

Love and Scapes


First day at the market

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Rain, Rain and more rain, then a little bit of sunshine at around 11am… not bad for the first day of the Cornwall Farmers’ Market.

Our helper Sarah at the Love Love Booth at the Cornwall Farmers' Market
Our helper Sarah

Well Friday night was a late one, I was preparing the last minute things needed for the launch of the market… you know like making some lemon cream cheese icing, lol! I was also checking my weather app every 10 minutes to see if the weather forecast for the morning had changed… but it wasn’t.

But I was not going to let this yucky weather bring me down, I had some foodie fare to prep (as many of you we’re coming to the market to see us). 🙂

My offerings this past Saturday were the following: preserves (favorites and new ones line Vanillalicious Rhubarb Jam and Hold on to your Bonnet Jelly), mini bunt zucchini cakes, brownie lava cakes, Rony’s Soap, Oyster mushrooms, chocolate and zucchini cakes and  asparagus. We sold out of the mini cakes, and had very little veggies left.

One of the nicest parts of the market, was seeing all of the other vendors (most of them we hadn’t seen since last October) and catching-up with the regulars from last season. There we’re some new faces on Saturday; Amy with her Epicure products and coffee and treats from Dish Real Food.

Debbie over at Kd’s Kupboard had everyone talking about these new cured sausages (I’ll have to get the name of them and update this post), they were soooo good that she sold out of one of them. Tamara from Langview Farms is back, we bought some Italian sausages from her and had them for dinner tonight… yum!

We’re really looking forward to this season; bringing you some new products and oh so yummy baked goods.

Alex Syvester, Tony Lacroix & Debbie Burns
Alex Sylvester, Tony Lacroix & Debbie Burns

Big thank you to Jason Setnyk for taking the above picture.

Come and visit the Love Love Food booth every Saturday from 8am to 12 (noon) on George Assaly Lane in Cornwall, Ontario.

Love and Freshness


Oyster Mushrooms

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What is an oyster mushroom?

What is an oyster mushroom?

Oyster Mushroom Risotto

This fan-shaped mushroom grows both wild and cultivated in close clusters, often on rotting tree trunks. They’re also called oyster caps , tree mushrooms , tree oyster mushrooms , summer oyster mushrooms , pleurotte and shimeji . The cap varies in color from pale gray to dark brownish-gray. The stems are grayish-white. The flavor of raw oyster mushrooms is fairly robust and slightly peppery but becomes much milder when cooked. They’re available in some areas year-round, particularly in specialty produce and Asian markets. Young oyster mushrooms (1 1/2 inches in diameter and under) are considered the best. Also available are canned oyster mushrooms, which should be rinsed before using.

Oyster Mushroom Risotto – Serves 4

Italian-grown arborio rice is often used for risottos. It has grains that are shorter and fatter than any other rice. The high starch content of arborio rice yields a creamy texture when cooked. However, if it is difficult to obtain, then a similar rice can be substituted. Risotto takes about 20 minutes of careful cooking and watching. Other things can be prepared while keeping a corner of the eye on this dish.


• 5 tablespoons vegetable cooking oil
• 500g oyster mushrooms, fibrous stems removed and reserved for stock; caps torn into pieces like broccoli florets if very large
• Salt to taste
• 1 large shallot, finely diced
• 2 tablespoons extra cooking oil
• 5 cups warm water
• 2 cups rice
• 1/2 cup grated dried Parmesan, plus more for serving

How to do it:

1. Chop up a few of the tougher ends from oyster mushroom clusters and add to the 5 cups water to make a mushroom broth. Simmer over medium heat for 15 minutes. Vegetable of chicken broth can also be used.

2. In a large, heavy frying pan, heat 3 tablespoons of the vegetable oil over medium heat until very hot, but not quite smoking. Sauté the roughly chopped mushrooms, in 3 equal batches, for about 5-10 minutes or until they are soft and tender. Take care not to crowd the pan. Add a small pinch of salt halfway through cooking.

3. Remove sautéed mushrooms with a slotted spoon and set aside. Repeat with the remaining mushrooms, adding an additional tablespoon of oil per batch. Set mushrooms aside – to be added the last few minutes of cooking.

4. In a large pot set over medium heat, combine the 2 tablespoons of extra cooking oil and the finely chopped shallot. Cook and stir until the shallot is softened, 3-4 minutes. Do not brown it.

5. Add the rice. Stir until all of the rice grains are coated in the fat and have become translucent around the edges, about a minute.

6. Raise the heat to high and immediately add the simmering broth a cup at a time until it is absorbed by the rice. Stir and repeat, adding broth as rice absorbs it. Stir the rice, making sure you get into the corners of your pot with your spoon, so the rice doesn’t stick. A pot with a rounded bottom, that is a saucier, will help to make sure the rice does not stick and burn. Continue stirring until most of the liquid has been absorbed by the rice. Add another 1/2 cup of broth and keep stirring.

7. Continue adding the broth, 1/2 cup at a time, adding more only when the last 1/2 cup has been absorbed. Keep stirring. Depending on the rice, you may use all of the liquid, or you may have some liquid left over. Or you may need to add additional rice. Keep an eye on the rice, tasting a grain at a time at the end, if you need to, to determine when the rice is done.

8. The rice be close to cooked after 20 minutes. It should be soft but a little firm when bit – al dente. The cy dry rice taste fades with cooking.

9. Stir in about three-quarters of the reserved sautéed mushrooms. Add the Parmesan cheese. Taste and correct for salt.

10. To serve: spoon risotto into a bowl. Top with some of the remaining sautéed mushrooms and more cheese if liked (and some chives if you wish).


Love and Oyster Mushrooms!